Triple synchronous cancers: a medical and ethical problem

  • Lučka Debevec
  • Rok Cesar
  • Izidor Kern

Abstract

Background. In a patient with suspicious synchronous multiple tumours, there are limited possibilities for effective therapy. Therefore, the decision for invasive diagnostics and precise staging of tumours is questionable, especially in elderly patients suitable only for symptomatic therapy.

Case report. A 78-year-old man with hypertension and angina pectoris was admitted to the hospital due to syncope. Two primary lung tumours and a kidney tumour were detected by imaging investigation. The patient refused invasive diagnostics and left the hospital. After 19 months he was readmitted in an impaired clinical condition and subsequently died of bronchopneumonia. The autopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the right upper lobe with metastases to regional lymph nodes and to the brain, small-cell carcinoma of the left upper lobe with metastases to regional lymph nodes and to the spleen, and clear-cell kidney carcinoma with multiple metastases to the lungs. All tumours were necrotizing, and therefore we assumed that any attempt at specific therapy would have been ineffective.

Conclusions. In an elderly patient with advanced lung tumors and suspicious synchronous triple cancers, the "wait and see" option can be suitable.

Author Biographies

Lučka Debevec
Rok Cesar
Izidor Kern
Published
2007-06-01
How to Cite
Debevec, L., Cesar, R., & Kern, I. (2007). Triple synchronous cancers: a medical and ethical problem. Radiology and Oncology, 41(2). Retrieved from https://radioloncol.com/index.php/ro/article/view/1234
Section
Clinical oncology